AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio)

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  1. 1 vote
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Hello! Some more information about this would be good. Do you mean what glyphs exist in A vs. B? Font-level information, like UPM or other metrics? Or comparing the shapes of a glyph in font A with that same glyph in font B?

  2. 1 vote
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    I believe this could be possible. It gets a little tricky, because you can't have a file named &.svg or *.svg for example :-) I think it would have to be the Unicode Code Point hex number as the file name.

  3. 1 vote
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Hello!

    "Components" in Glyphr Studio can either be a single shape, or many shapes. Components can also contain other components... from the tool's point of view, a glyph contains a stack of either components and/or shapes.

    While you are on a Glyph, there is an Action called "Add Component Instance" (it's a green square with a + sign). This will bring up a list of your current components to add to that glyph. Additionally, entire glyphs can be used as components in other glyphs, so they are shown in the "Add Component Instance" dialog as well.

    So, I believe the "Add Component Instance" function should work as your "Library of Shapes" - let me know if i'm not understanding correctly!

  4. 1 vote
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    This is already a feature! When you have multi-selected shapes, just select the "Combine Shapes" action. The icon is a little Circle and Square merged, should be on the right hand side of the Shape Actions section. It only appears when two or more shapes are selected.

  5. 4 votes
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Hello! It turns out that this is somewhat mathematically impossible. So, we're left with approximations, and even that gets a bit complex. So, the easier option overall is to use Bezier curves in your SVG to begin with. I know this isn't a great answer - usually we try to make stuff like this very transparent and easy for the user. This one case is an exception.

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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Right now we have Glyph Position available to modify via a Global Action (move all glyphs a certain x/y amount) - I think eventually we can expose all Glyph attributes as global actions. Moving a certain amount, but also setting certain properties to true or false... like auto width!

  7. 10 votes
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    2 comments  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    This has always been a highly-requested feature! Currently, OpenType.js does not support color fonts (we use them to read and write OTF files) - but I am working with them to see if they can make it happen. This is one of those features (like Kerning) that as soon as they support it, we will add support to Glyphr Studio as well.

    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) supported this idea  · 
  8. 4 votes
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    2 comments  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    The basic problem with this is that font files are Vector - they store glyph outlines as mathematical curves. SVG is a common Vector file type.

    If you scan handwritten letters, you will get a Raster file, which is made up of pixels, not outlines. Common Raster file types are PNG and JPEG.

    To create a handwritten font, you need to outline your raster images with a vector editor, like Inkscape or Adobe Illustrator.

    There are some programs that can automatically outline a raster image and create vector outlines - but these don't always work out very well.

  9. 4 votes
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    So, there are two answers to your request. The first answer is - you are in luck, the feature we are working on adding right now is a "move all glyphs" global action, which would do what you are asking.
    The second answer is a little more philosophical. "Baseline" is probably the most important key metric in designing a typeface... but it is just an abstraction. If all your glyphs sat 10 units above the baseline, then the overall typeface would appear normal (the only thing that may be odd is the underlined version of your text). So saying "Wrong Baseline" is a bit odd, but could technically happen. Would you mind sending me a font file that has a wrong baseline? mail@glyphrstudio.com thanks!

  10. 11 votes
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Combining two fonts has been a suggestion - I think there is a couple ways we could do this, and it may happen soon(ish?) There are some complexities about having two projects open, or, if we're putting one project into another, choosing which glyphs overwrite which other existing ones.

    You can currently Import an SVG that represents a single Glyph.

    You cannot export a single glyph as SVG... but if you export the SVG Font file, and aren't afraid of opening up the SVG with a text editor, you could go find the glyph you are looking for in the SVG Font file. That single glyph SVG could be ripped out and put into an individual file. Maybe that's a good workaround. Although, thinking about it, we already have an internal function that generates a SVG file per glyph, so it may not be too hard to implement.

    I'll add these ideas to our backlog. Thank you!

  11. 16 votes
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    4 comments  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Right not this is just an idea for a feature. Currently this action of combining fonts is not possible in Glyphr Studio.

    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Yes, this is a great idea! All the mechanisms for importing glyphs (either all or partial range) are in place... Maybe just drag-and-drop the 2nd font file onto the canvas, and prompt the user which glyphs to import / merge?

    What would you expect to happen if the 1st font already had a glyph design, and the user chose to import another glyph from the 2nd font on top of it? Add the shapes from the 2nd over the 1st? Delete the 1st? Don't import the 2nd?

  12. 1 vote
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    3 comments  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    :-) So here's the deal. For OTF files, we use another (open source) project called (wait for it) Opentype.js to read and write OTF files. Right now, they don't support... lots of stuff, including Kerning, Ligatures, and Variables and Color etc etc.

    The workaround we use is exporting to SVG Font (which is a special subset of SVG) then using some online translator tool to convert SVG Font to OTF. That's how we can get Kern and Ligatures into an OTF designed in Glyphr Studio.

    The OTHER other problem is that SVG Font is kind of a dead format, not being updated or maintained any more. So, they may have support for color, just because SVG has support for color. But I would highly doubt SVG Fonts have support for OTF Variables.

    Essentially we are waiting for Opentype.js to add features, and when they do, they will also show up in Glyphr Studio.

    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Actually, i'm not sure! I'll investigate - if it's easy then I can consider adding it, theoretically it shouldn't be that hard.

  13. 1 vote
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Hello! Typefaces are vector, which means they are stored as mathematical outlines, and not as pixels. This is why you can scale fonts as large or as small as you want without them looking pixelated. Images that use pixels to store information are called Raster.

    There are some Vector image formats, namely SVG, that can be edited with programs like Adobe Illustrator or Inkscape. Glyphr Studio supports importing SVG outlines!

    Other programs like Photoshop or Paint that save PNGs or JPGs are raster programs, and cannot be imported into Glyphr Studio. If this is what you have, you'll need to trace the raster images in Adobe Illustrator or Inkscape (or some other Vector program) to convert them to outlines.

  14. 1 vote
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Glyphr Studio can edit any Unicode character range! Only basic Latin is enabled by default. But, if you go to Font Settings, scroll down to Custom Glyph Ranges, you can add a Cyrillic range, looks like 0x0400 to 0x04FF for basic Cyrillic.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrillic_script_in_Unicode

  15. 1 vote
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Exporting and importing other formats would be great. At the moment we are limited by OpenType.js which only imports OTF and TTF - additionally we support SVG Fonts.

    You can do this as a work-around - export you font from Glyphr Studio to SVG Font (which supports Ligatures and Kerning), then use an online font converter to convert from SVG to whatever format you wish.

  16. 2 votes
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    3 comments  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    If a font contains Contextual Alternates, your typesetting program must also allow you to choose to use the alternates. This differs from program to program.

    Also, fonts created with Glyphr Studio cannot contain alternates, it isn't supported at this time.

    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    This is a great idea. Unfortunately, at the moment we are restricted by the features supported in OpenType.js, and this is one of the OpenType features that is not currently supported by OpenType.js.

    It is possible to include alternates in the Unicode "Private Use Area" which is the range 0xE000 to 0xF8FF - they will be part of the font, but they won't behave like OpenType contextual alternates.

  17. 1 vote
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    2 comments  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Global Actions are in v1.10 - Convert to Monospace is one of these actions, which disables auto-width. The next Global Action to be added will be setting any Glyph property, so stay tuned for that.

    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Bulk actions are actually something we are working on right now! We don't have an exact release date for the next update, but it should be in the next couple of weeks. The specific feature for turning off auto-width (and specifying a set width) for all glyphs will be one of the global actions.

  18. 2 votes
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Yes, this is obviously a huge gap. Right now, we rely on the OpenType.js project to read and write font files. OpenType.js does not support saving ligatures and kerning, so we can't implement it. They are working on it, but no idea when it will be available.

    The workaround is to Export to SVG Font, then use an online font converter to convert to whatever other format you need (like OTF). This is what I do - it is an extra step, but it does work.

  19. 1 vote
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    This is a good idea, and shouldn't be too hard to implement. I'll add it to our backlog of ideas. Thank you!

  20. 9 votes
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    1 comment  ·  Suggest a New Feature or Improvement  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    AdminGlyphr Studio (The Head Honcho, Glyphr Studio) commented  · 

    Hello! OTF files are encoded as filled / closed shapes - there is no option (at the file data level) to specify paths with weight. This could be a feature, though, where the user specifies a path with weight, and when we export to OTF, that line is converted into a closed shape.

    Illustrator already does this via the "Outline Path" command. Also, the 0,0 in font files is different than SVG or Canvas. There is a lot of conversion done between SVG and OTF, because they are designed to do very different things. Glyphr Studio handles both - so, for instance, when you import SVG to Glyphr Studio, we do the math to flip the 0,0 to the right place.

    You could do your first phase of design work in Illustrator with lines, then "Outline Path" them all, and import them to Glyphr Studio as SVG.

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